Uncle Bob’s Club General Neurology Fellows

Thanks to the generosity of Uncle Bob’s Club (UBC) and their supporters, aspiring paediatric neurologists can receive the best training to care for Victoria’s sickest children at The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH). Meet some of the past UBC General Neurology Fellows and learn about how philanthropy helps develop the brightest medical minds.

Dr. Vivek Jain – 2011 Fellow

Dr Vivek Jain was appointed the UBC General Neurology Fellow in 2011. Dr Jain had completed his subspecialty training in paediatric neurology in the United Kingdom (UK) before moving to Melbourne to gain further experience at the RCH.

When did you realise you had an interest in neurology?

I have always found paediatric neurology fascinating and challenging because of the variety of problems that could affect the developing brain of  infants and young children. I realised this specialty had huge potential for development and research during my postgraduate paediatrics training in India. This interest was further strengthened whilst working as a paediatric neurology trainee in the UK.

How did the UBC fellowship help you in your career?

I was able to enhance my clinical skills in diagnosing complex paediatric neurological conditions in  the busy referral centre at the RCH.  This is where I also gained significant exposure and training in paediatric neurology subspecialties like epilepsy and neuromuscular disorders.  I was also able to improve my ability to interpret neurophysiological (EEGs) and neuroradiological (brain scan) investigations. In this way, the UBC fellowship complimented the training I had already received in the UK.

What are you doing currently?

I am working as a Consultant Paediatric Neurologist in Jaipur, North India.

What would you like to say to UBC and their supporters for funding this position?

It was only because of the UBC fellowship grant that I was able to come and train at such a world class Neurology Department. Whenever I see a child come to my hospital from a remote village, I think of how impactful my training was. By learning from my colleagues at the RCH I have developed the knowledge and expertise to treat these children who previously had no other options.

Dr. Kathryn Irving – 2017 Fellow

Dr Kathryn Irving was appointed the UBC General Neurology Fellow in 2017. An accomplished clinician and historian, Kathryn has been working within the RCH Neurology Department for four years and is passionate about supporting children with neurological conditions.

When did you realise you had an interest in neurology?

My primary interest was in children with disability and that’s what led me into neurology, this department was a fantastic place to work and for me it just ticks all the boxes: it’s an intellectual challenge especially with diagnosis, and the genetic revolution has played a huge role in neurology, perhaps more so than other fields. The brain is endlessly fascinating and so there is lifelong learning.

How did the UBC fellowship help you in your career?

Being the General Neurology Fellow gave me primary responsibility for caring for children admitted to hospital with neurological conditions. It was an amazing opportunity to learn general neurology from my medical, nursing and allied health colleagues, and I also benefitted from the department’s research and clinical expertise in various sub-fields. Overall, the fellowship helped me build my knowledge and skills in clinical care.

What are you doing currently?

I am currently working as the Rats of Tobruk Epilepsy Neurology Fellow at the RCH, refining my skills in this specialty as I progress towards becoming a qualified paediatric neurologist.

What would you like to say to UBC and their supporters for funding this position?

Uncle Bob’s Club and their supporters are guaranteeing that Victoria is going to have world-class paediatric neurologists in the future and it’s just not possible without these kinds of training and fellowships. Their incredible commitment to the RCH Neurology Department is really inspiring and reminds me that the work that I’m doing is important and valued by the community.